Why We Have to Create More Disabled Characters in Children’s Fiction – Susie Day

In classic children’s fiction, physical disability tends to be co-opted not only as a cautionary tale, but a completely useless one where it turns out you’ll be ok in the end – so long as you’re nice, or you try hard.

Representation of characters with disabilities in fiction, though on the rise is recent years, is still relatively low. How do people without disabilities write about those that do? What responsibilities do the writers have? What happens when writers make good-faith efforts, but fail to adequately fairly and positively represent people with disabilities in fiction? How can we balance representation with sensitivity?

Why We Have to Create More Disabled Characters in Children’s Fiction – Susie Day

Image via The Guardian
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